. *{ rain }* .

This post begins with an apology; my attention has been distracted by a few temporary projects and I’ve neglected posting for a few weeks. So I’m sorry, but I’m back! Summer has now turned to fall and the heavy clouds and slower pace have nudged me into my own season of long-procrastinated projects, creativity and cleaning. In Seattle, our summer started pretty late and appropriately stuck around longer than usual. Surprisingly, I found myself looking forward to the promised rains in this part of the country and I felt an unexpected peace when they finally arrived.

Rain has been the backdrop for the majority of my life. I walked to school in it, played sports in it, had recess in it, went camping in it, rode my bike in it, basically just grew up in it. Possibly because of this, I didn’t have as much wonder about rain as I did with many other natural phenomena. I just recently recognized this as I became more aware of a growing, unfamiliar affinity and raw appreciation for something I’ve been around my whole life.

I look forward to storms and rain showers, they feel almost like a form of emotional and physical cleansing. I love the power of rain’s dynamic states, how it can be oh so gentle or incredibly forceful, spiritual or physical, nurturing or a burden, metaphorical or scientific, life giving or life taking. More recently for me, a humbling experience; a reminder of my respect and reliance on nature and the systems of our Earth and Universe. I am grateful and excited by this unfolding relationship.



. .Chronos. .

The film “Chronos” was made before I was born however, considering its quality and eternal subject matter, that would be hard to guess. I was first introduced to this by a friend while in Europe last year and I was immediately in love. It is a visually striking, beautiful project exploring “time”.Chronos was made in 1985 by Ron Fricke using customized time-lapsed cameras, set to a soundtrack by Michael Stearns. The title is taken from an ancient Greek word χρόνος or “khronos” which translates to “time”. They traveled to five continents shooting some truly amazing places from nature, past art and architecture, to aspects of modern life.You might recognize a similar shooting style in the well-known “Koyaanisqatsi” film where Ron Fricke was the cinematographer. He also made the films, “Baraka” and “Sacred Site” (I’ll post about Baraka at a later date but I have yet to watch Sacred Site). For me, his films seem to have three things in common: provoking thought, striking imagery, and a powerful experience.

This is a YouTube version of the full movie. Like most visual experiences, I recommend watching this at best quality and loud <3 Seriously, some of these sequences rock my effing face off. So, enjoy : ) …